Loving-Kindness / Metta / Maitri

How to Do Metta – Lion’s Roar – Meditation Article

Kuan Yin, bodhisattva of compassion. Photo by Liza Matthews. Jack Kornfield on beginning this time-honored, heart-opening practice. In our culture, people find it difficult to direct loving-kindness to themselves. We may feel that we are unworthy, or that it’s egotistical, or that we shouldn’t be happy when other people are suffering. So rather than start loving-kindness practice with ourselves, which is traditional, I find it more helpful to start with those we most naturally love and care about. One of…

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A Practice for Developing Kindness Toward Yourself – Meditation Article

Valerie Mason-John, author of Detox Your Heart: Meditations for Emotional Healing, shares a meditation for cultivating a positive relationship with yourself, and, by extension, the world. Photo by Anh Phan. When we take positive action and respond creatively to our anger, we are taking good care of ourselves. Taking care of our hearts, minds, and bodies is taking positive action. Learning to be kind and loving toward ourselves is a challenge. It is also part of the lifelong practice of…

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How Maitri Opens Your Heart – Meditation Article

Maitri means loving-kindness or unconditional friendliness. David Nichtern shows you how to do this heart-opening Buddhist practice, and Cyndi Lee explains how to incorporate it in your yoga practice. Photo by Xevi Casanovas. Our hearts are always fundamentally open. They’re just covered up sometimes by doubt, hesitation, fear, anxiety, and all kinds of self-protective habitual patterns. The practice of opening the heart is based on exploring and reversing some of these patterns. We cultivate openness while noting and dissolving the…

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How to Practice Loving-Kindness – Lion’s Roar – Meditation Article

JoAnna Hardy teaches us the famed Buddhist practice of metta – offering love to ourselves and others. Illustrations by Tomi Um. When I was introduced to the practice of metta—most often translated as lovingkindness practice—I definitely knew it wasn’t for me. It was too mushy and sentimental for my pragmatic mind. It was reminiscent of the wishful praying that I thought was reserved for the type of faith I had left behind. I didn’t really believe that I—or maybe any living…

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